PRIORITY HABITAT

Western bund and historic waterway

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A linear water, wetlands and grassland eco-system along the Old Tillage waterway.

What's here

The western boundary of the site includes a wide grassy bund with patches of scrub and scattered trees which is situated next to a watercourse previously known as Car Dyke and now thought to be part of 'Old Tillage' - a local network connecting the River Cam to the Old West River and the Fens.

A linear water, wetlands and grassland eco-system.

'Old Tillage' is a local watercourse connecting the River Cam to the Old West River and the Fens and was used for moving goods around

The enhancement and creation of species rich grassland habitats along Old Tillage will benefit species groups such as reptiles, invertebrates and bats.

Common lizard

Aspirations for the ecology here

A patchwork of habitats including grassland, wetland and trees/shrubs will be created to benefit species associated with this area such as butterflies, moths, common lizard, birds and bats. Its unshaded location and areas of sunny grass slopes will offer good conditions for reptiles such as common lizard and grass snake to bask in the sun. Grassland and wetland areas will also provide ideal habitats for reptiles.

Management and enhancement of the Old Tillage will help other species that may commute through the area including water vole and otter. Public use will be managed through the creation of dedicated footpaths. Connections to the northern buffer area will provide complementary habitats with extensive habitat corridors linking into the wider development.

Priority species at the Western bund and historic waterway

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